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"Architectual Marvel"
The Palacio Barolo is a remarkable and luxurious building, designed by Italian architect Mario Palanti, by request of a powerful Argentinean textile tycoon. Finished in 1923, the Palacio Barolo was meant to be the final resting place of Dante Alighieri's ashes, a safe haven for the writer's remains far away from a war-torn Europe. That dream never came true, and today it is mainly used as an office building. Filled with countless exquisite references, to the Divine Comedy and wonderfully decorated, it was the tallest construction in South America for several years. The view of Buenos Aires city-center from the 24th floor is second to none. Guided tours are available.
1370 Avenue de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1085
"Architectual Marvel"
The Palacio Barolo is a remarkable and luxurious building, designed by Italian architect Mario Palanti, by request of a powerful Argentinean textile tycoon. Finished in 1923, the Palacio Barolo was meant to be the final resting place of Dante Alighieri's ashes, a safe haven for the writer's remains far away from a war-torn Europe. That dream never came true, and today it is mainly used as an office building. Filled with countless exquisite references, to the Divine Comedy and wonderfully decorated, it was the tallest construction in South America for several years. The view of Buenos Aires city-center from the 24th floor is second to none. Guided tours are available.
What's nearby?
Palacio Barolo

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1370 Avenue de Mayo
Buenos Aires, Argentina, C1085
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Named for its location directly, across from the National Congress Building, this plaza contains a large monolith, that represents the start for all its national highways. This plaza almost encompasses three city blocks (its western-most point along Ave. de Mayo), and is an ideal place for recreation and rest. One of the city's best and most valuable sculptures, is a bronze reproduction of The Thinker by Auguste Rodin, which can be found in the plaza.

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9 de Julio Avenue is to Buenos Aires what the Champs Elysees is to Paris - if you have not walked along 9 de Julio Avenue, you have not truly experienced the city. Some of the city's most significant landmarks are right along or on this street, including the Obelisk and Teatro Colón. Honoring Argentina's Independence Day (July 9, 1816), the name of the street is pregnant with meaning. Argentinians take pride in the fact that 9 de Julio Avenue is probably the widest street in the world. Crossing this avenue means crossing three intersections. Some like to run through the lights to see who makes it through the quickest. What's the hurry? Take your time to enjoy the historic avenue.

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This avenue used to be the centre of Porteño nightlife and it still retains the original bohemian amibiance immortalized in popular lore. In the 1930s it was widened and numerous cinemas, theatres, and restaurants quickly lined its sidewalks. Antique, rare and used bookstores are clustered here as well, interspersed with the traditional Porteño cafés. Exchange houses are easily located along this avenue for the many tourists who flock here. The Obelisco (Obelisk) and this famous avenue, constitute the city's icons, and the typical picture postcard view of Buenos Aires.

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This palace receives the Camera of Senators and the Camera of Representatives of the nation. Victor Meano who was the architect of this palace, emphasized on the Italian style and classical memoirs of that era. The center of the facade, with its ramps and Corinthian styled stoops, is definitely worth a see. There is an imposing dome, and other many important sculptures representing justice and equality among men. The visits are free and guided, and it is recommended that you arrive in business attire.

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Those who love street art should definitely take a tour of Murals by Blu. Blu is not the artist, its the pseudonym of the artist who's been actively painting the streets in Buenos Aires and many other cities. Originally from Italy, the artist has been painting in several parts of the world since 1999. There are guided tours in Buenos Aires that take you around to see his works. His works are based on various social situations, for instance, his bicycle mural shows the city's pitiful traffic jam state and how a bicycle can be a better option to beat it! Blu's masterpieces are a must visit for art lovers.

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This monolith is a meeting place, for political demonstrations, musical performances and celebrations over victories of the national soccer team. It was dedicated in 1936, to commemorate the anniversary of Buenos Aires' first foundation. It measures 70 meters (230 feet) high and is made of reinforced concrete. In its interior a 200-hundred-step stairway,is used to perform maintenance jobs from the top. The obelisk brightens with white lights at night, but the gleams of surrounding neon billboards, is what gives the area its unique and colorful glow.

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The double-decker tour bus is operated by the City of Buenos Aires. Tourists can hop on and off at will to enjoy 20 of the most important landmarks and neighborhoods in the city. Tickets can be purchased for 24 or 48 hours and children under three are free. There is a five percent discount if you buy tickets online through the official website. Tri-lingual guides in English, Spanish and Portuguese are on board every bus. Taped audio synchronized with the bus route is also available. A free bi-monthly magazine with pictures and stories about the various locations on route comes with the tour. Buses run every 15 minutes. The complete circuit takes about three hours. It's a great way to get to know this wonderful city.

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These tunnels were apparently built by Jesuit monks, as a connection between their temples and convents in case of an emergency. Later they were also used for smuggling. All of the tunnels pass below the "Block of Lights", and were accidentally discovered in 1911 during construction of water lines and Line A of the subway. To accommodate visitors, access to both levels is now available. Although the passageways are not very long, it is still an experience worth taking. The tunnels run from the San Ignacio Church toward Perú Street, and from there, another runs towards Moreno Street. Underground, one can see foundations of buildings from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, as well as an intersection of tunnels, reaching five meters below the earth. Another tunnel contains the entrance to the National College of Buenos Aires. Some historians speculate that the original tunnels reached from the coast of the river all the way to the Recoleta neighborhood. One hour guided tours are available to the public.

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