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Long Live Frida Kahlo
Museo Frida Kahlo was home to the enigmatic painter Frida Kahlo, where she occasionally lived with her husband Diego Rivera. Personal objects such as jewelry, unfinished canvases propped on easels, her typical tehuana ornate dresses, paper maché and pre-Hispanic objects, as well as her wheelchair, are on display in the studio where she painted. Works by Mexican painters such as José María Velasco, Claussel and Orozco among others, are exhibited alongside some of Frida's own paintings. No photography is allowed. Admission prices vary over the weekends.
247 Londres, Colonia del Carmen Mexico City
Today: 10:00 AM-05:30 PM Open Now
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Tuesday 10:00 AM to 05:30 PM
Wednesday 11:00 AM to 05:30 PM
Thursday to Sunday 10:00 AM to 05:30 PM
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Museo Frida Kahlo

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Cantabar Collage
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El Hábito
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Teatro La Capilla
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Teatro Bar El Vicio
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La Bipolar
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247 Londres, Colonia del Carmen
Mexico City, 04100
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This large old house was a safe haven for the Russian leader Leon Trotsky and became his final resting-place. Expelled from the Soviet Union in 1929, he found refuge in Mexico in 1937, thanks to support from Diego Rivera. In 1940 the Spanish communist Ramon Mercader assassinated him in this very house. The political leader's original furnishings and his remains, buried beneath a modest monument in the garden, add intrigue to the museum. There are guided tours available.

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The 17th century Templo de San Diego and Convento de Santa María de los Angeles, founded in the sixteenth century, together comprise this historical museum. The temple and convent, also known as the Convento Churubusco, served as fortresses for Mexican troops against the invasion by the United States in 1847. After several ends, in 1981 the buildings were designated as a museum. The 14 exhibition halls provide a complete overview of the many invasions by foreign governments withstood by Mexico throughout its history.

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This museum, renovated by and named after Dr. Alvar and Carmen Carillo Gil, is found in the outlying area of the old neighborhood of Chimalistac. The 1,581 works housed here represent a lifetime of art collecting and boast contemporary Mexican artists, highlighting the muralists, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Diego Rivera and José Clemente Orozco, along with works by Carillo Gill (1899-1974) himself and others. There is also a fine selection of 17th and 18th-century Japanese Ukiyo-e (wood-block prints of the "floating world") and etchings by European artists, Klee, Braque, Picasso, Kandinsky and Rouault. There are also temporary exhibits.

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This house, designed by Juan O'Gorman in 1933, was the birthplace for many of Diego Rivera's projects. It remains virtually untouched from the day in which the muralist died. Among the many personal objects on view he also left unfinished canvases on over-sized easels, pre-Hispanic pieces, photographs and his collection of judas figures. These bearded demons are made of carton, filled with firecrackers and are set off on the Saturday of Glory before Easter Sunday.

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Inspired by pre-Hispanic lines and architecture and using volcanic rock, Diego Rivera conceived and designed Anahuacalli (house in the valley), which opened in 1964. Thousands of objects are exhibited, many of them pottery or colored stone figures symbolizing water and air deities of these civilizations. The objects formed part of Rivera's personal collection of pre-Columbian art that he donated to the Mexican people. Every November an altar is erected here during Latin America's largest alms to the dead.

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Art & Idea is truly dedicated to promoting art and culture on both the national as well as international fronts. This non-profit institution was founded by Robert Punkenhofer in 1995. While the main museum is located in Mexico City, it has project space in New York, Madrid, and Berlin. Vito Acconci, Daniel Guzman and Carolee Schneemann are just some of the world-renowned artists who have exhibited their works here. It has partnered with renowned institutions from New York and Spain in organizing events. Most impressive though, is the work done to promote public art projects.

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Come and enjoy the 19th-century atmosphere of this viceroyal mansion with its Mexican and European works of art. Each of its owners has added invaluable pieces to the collection, making this museum one of the most interesting in Mexico City. This museum once housed important personalities of the 19th and 20th centuries, and today presents decorative pieces from the second half of the 19th century.

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