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"The Best Shows in a White Marble Palace"
In 1904 the construction of the Palace of Fine Arts began on the remains of the Santa Isabel convent. Porfirio Diaz had wanted to inaugurate it in 1911, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Mexico's independence from Spain. However, the project, under the guidance of Italian architect Adamo Boari, suffered serious setbacks due to the instability of the ground that had been chosen for the building. Time passed, the revolution broke out, and in the end the palace was not completed until 1934, with architect Federico Mariscal heading the project. It is not strange, therefore, that the marble facade, built in a style between Neo-Classical and Art Nouveau, is contrasted by an interior that looks much more Art Deco in appearance. Art connoisseurs will certainly appreciate the museum's murals by Rivera, Siqueiros, Orozco, Tamayo and Montenegro, along with the glass Tiffany curtain, composed of almost a million individual pieces, on which Doctor Atl (a modern Mexican landscape painter) depicted the volcanoes of Mexico.
1 Avenida Juárez & Eje Lázaro Cárdenas, Mexico City, Mexico, 06050
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"The Best Shows in a White Marble Palace"
In 1904 the construction of the Palace of Fine Arts began on the remains of the Santa Isabel convent. Porfirio Diaz had wanted to inaugurate it in 1911, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Mexico's independence from Spain. However, the project, under the guidance of Italian architect Adamo Boari, suffered serious setbacks due to the instability of the ground that had been chosen for the building. Time passed, the revolution broke out, and in the end the palace was not completed until 1934, with architect Federico Mariscal heading the project. It is not strange, therefore, that the marble facade, built in a style between Neo-Classical and Art Nouveau, is contrasted by an interior that looks much more Art Deco in appearance. Art connoisseurs will certainly appreciate the museum's murals by Rivera, Siqueiros, Orozco, Tamayo and Montenegro, along with the glass Tiffany curtain, composed of almost a million individual pieces, on which Doctor Atl (a modern Mexican landscape painter) depicted the volcanoes of Mexico.
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Palace of Fine Arts

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El Hombre, Controlador del Universo
2
Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional
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Palacio de Bellas Artes
4
Sala Manuel M. Ponce
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Museo Nacional de Arquitectura
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1 Avenida Juárez & Eje Lázaro Cárdenas
Mexico City, Mexico, 06050
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On the third floor of the Palacio de Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Museum) is this famous mural by Diego Rivera. The original was commissioned by the Rockefeller Center in New York. When this affluent family realized that the mural contained an anti-capitalist message, they destroyed it. Fortunately, Rivera was able to produce a copy of the very same mural for the Palacio de Bellas Artes in 1934. The new version is an even more dramatic portrayal of the conflict between capitalism and socialism. To see all the murals in the Fine Arts Museum, you have to pay, except on Sunday when entrance is free.

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In the theater inside the Palacio de Bellas Artes, in various seasons, the best classical music and contemporary ensembles are presented. This is one of the largest orchestras in terms of number of participants, and the most renowned at a worldwide level, for it has taken part in a great number of international festivals. Tickets range from 80 to 160 pesos, and discounts apply to teachers, students and senior citizens with valid cards. You can get tickets at the theater, or through the Ticketmaster system, by phone or on the Internet. Year-round performances are offered.

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El Palacio de Bellas Artes, apart from being a beautiful stage for international opera, also reserves space for theater. Classical plays from world literature are adapted for the Mexican audience. Great actors and directors have worked here. The theater is run by the Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes and is a venue for major cultural events. The stunning architecture of Federico Mariscal only adds to the dramatic impact of each show seen here. Illustrious companies like the Orquesta Sinfonica National, Compania Nacional de Danza, Compania Nacional de Opera and Orquesta de Camara de Bellas Artes regularly feature here. This is a venue that is very safe and cheap parking is available.

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Built between 1902 and 1907 by the Italian architect of the Palacio de Bellas Artes (Fine Arts Museum), Adamo Boari, the Post Office has a stone facade carved with renaissance motifs. The main entrance faces diagonally towards the corner, covered by a wrought iron awning sustained by thick chains, over which two balconies jut out. The interior has an interesting spatial distribution and decor combining wrought iron and Carrara marble used throughout the stairways, counter, tables and post boxes. In the upper levels of the building, there is a museum where the historical development of the Mexican postal service is shown through philately.

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The Palacio de Correos de Mexico is the main post office of Mexico City and has been established in early 20th century. The building has a mix of architectural styles, however, the most prominent ones include the Spanish Renaissance Revival and Plateresque styles. The building has undergone restorations in the past as it was severely damaged by an earthquake. Today, the building stands in its original form and also houses the Naval History Museum on its fourth story.

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The architect who designed what would be the first engineering school in the Americas was Manuel Tolsá, Spanish sculptor and adherent of the so-called Neo-Classical Mexican arts movement. This extraordinary palace of learning, part boarding school and part Mines Tribunal (regulatory body for the country's mining industry), was constructed between 1797 and 1813. Concurrent with Neo-Classical ideals, it has a solid and robust aspect with a majestic main patio, austere secondary patios and a stairway said to be the most beautiful in the country. Today, the building houses the Engineering School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, to which academic entity it also belongs. It is often used for cultural activities such as the book fair held each spring.

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Before the Hotel de Mexico was built in the 1980s, this was the city's tallest building. Inaugurated in 1950, it has 3000 public observation decks. Based on a design by Augusto H. Alvarez, it stands 181.33 meters high and is unique for its structure and foundations. Given the difficult terrain of seismic activity in the Valley of Mexico, it was proven sturdy by having withstood the violent earthquakes of 1957 and 1985. The first 37 floors are office space and there are restaurants, bars and other recreational activities also available. Free admission.

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Facing the Plaza Tolsá, this neo-classical building was constructed between 1904 and 1911. A statue of Carlos IV stands guard at the entrance of the Museo Nacional de Arte, which was opened in 1982. The marble sculptures now found in the museum's lobby were once displayed in the Alameda Central. The evolution of Mexican art from the pre-Hispanic era to the end of the 19th Century can be seen in the 14 exhibit halls. There are also temporary exhibits.

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