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"Where the Story of Asia Unfolds"
This 1910 building evokes the serenity of its era in its arched verandas, balanced symmetry, and dignified proportions fashionable in the 19th century England. A Sri Lankan figurine of Buddha, Islamic art and calligraphy, South-east Asian tribal wood carvings and other ethnographic collections trace Singapore's diverse cultural and religious origins to all over Asia. The Asian Civilisations Museum, however, leans heavily towards Chinese cultural heritage, with two-thirds of the galleries focusing on artifacts from China, with jade, ceramics, bronzes, and folk art, dating from the Neolithic Age to the 20th century.
1 Empress Place, Singapore, Singapore, 179555
Today: 09:00 AM - 07:00 PM Open Now
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Monday 01:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Tuesday to Sunday 09:00 AM to 07:00 PM
"Where the Story of Asia Unfolds"
This 1910 building evokes the serenity of its era in its arched verandas, balanced symmetry, and dignified proportions fashionable in the 19th century England. A Sri Lankan figurine of Buddha, Islamic art and calligraphy, South-east Asian tribal wood carvings and other ethnographic collections trace Singapore's diverse cultural and religious origins to all over Asia. The Asian Civilisations Museum, however, leans heavily towards Chinese cultural heritage, with two-thirds of the galleries focusing on artifacts from China, with jade, ceramics, bronzes, and folk art, dating from the Neolithic Age to the 20th century.
What's nearby?
Asian Civilisations Museum

1
Dalhousie Obelisk
2
Empress Place Building
3
Indochine Waterfront
4
Waterfront Restaurant
5
Bumboat Ride along Singapore River
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1 Empress Place
Singapore, Singapore, 179555
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Near Cavenagh Bridge stands a prominent white obelisk resembling the Cleopatra Needle on London's Thames embankment. Designed by John Turnbull Thomson, it was built to commemorate the visit of the British Governor-General of India, Marquis Dalhousie, in 1850. A strong advocate of free trade, Dalhousie was warmly received by the local leaders, traders and residents. His visit was considered significant, symbolizing that Singapore was finally gaining recognition from the higher authorities. After he left, funds were raised and the memorial built. Even today, the Dalhousie Obelisk stands as a symbol of free trade.

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At the northern bank of the Singapore River near Cavenagh Bridge stands this robust neoclassical structure named in honor of Queen Victoria. Designed by chief engineer Major McNair, the Empress Place Building was built in 1865 with a beautiful facade adorned with Doric columns and rustic French windows topped by ornate fanlights. Initially a courthouse, it had become the headquarters for some government offices by the 1960s. After a profound refurbishment, it was introduced to the public in 1989, its premises taken over by an art gallery, souvenir shops and eateries. You ought to visit the place when you come to Singapore.

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The founder of modern Singapore, Sir Stamford Raffles, has two statues built in his memory. The first is a dark bronze statue, depicting him standing and staring contemplatively with his arms folded. It was unveiled at its original location in the Padang in 1887 and transferred to its present site at the Empress Place a century later. While the other one is in Sir Raffles Landing Site at the banks of the Singapore River to mark the spot where Raffles first set foot on the island in 1819.

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Anderson Bridge is an elegant bridge spanning the mouth of the Singapore River displays an excellent combination of intricate plaster and metalwork unmatched by any other bridge locally. It comprises three steel arches with supporting steel ribs extending across them, two rusticated archways and a fluted pier at each end. Constructed between 1908-1910 to replace an older bridge, the Anderson Bridge was built with a good clearance to allow vessels to pass under at high tide. Named after Sir John Anderson (Governor of the Straits Settlements, 1904-1911) it was constructed because the Cavenagh Bridge was unable to cope with increasing traffic.

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The first Siamese King ever to tread on foreign grounds was King Chulalongkorn and his choice of destination, Singapore. Soon after his eight-day visit in 1871, the King conferred to the State this bronze Elephant Statue as a token of appreciation for the hospitality received during his stay here. Several other similar statues were presented to other cities, but this one is considered most special because it marks the first visit by a Siamese monarch to a foreign country. The statue initially took its place before the Victoria Memorial Hall and was later moved to its present location at the Old Parliament House in the year 1919.

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In 1990, on the 25th anniversary of Singapore's independence, a time capsule was sealed and kept in a small modernistic pyramid along the Singapore River. Standing in stark contrast to the colonial architecture and the solemn memorials in the area, this 'pyramid power' time capsule contains a collection of momentous items that trace the years of the Republic's sovereignty. The capsule is scheduled to be opened in the year 2015.

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The final classical structure built in the city area, the neoclassical Supreme Court was designed by municipal architect Dorrington Ward sometime between 1937 and 1939. One of the finest buildings of the British era, it is characterized by Corinthian pillars, Georgian windows and an imposing green dome. Also of architectural interest are the allegorical sculptures by Italian Calvalieri Rodolfo Nolli. The Supreme Court's internal grounds are not open to public. Check website for more details.

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One of the best spots in Singapore for outdoor dining, Boat Quay has come a long way from when the area was still a cargo-loading bay. A popular hangout for locals, expatriates and tourists, Boat Quay boasts chic cafes, high-end restaurants, trendy pubs and designer galleries. Rather than cargoes of trade, you find the riverside today awash with tables set up for alfresco dining. This picturesque, though busy, stretch offers great views of the Singapore River and part of the colonial district.

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0,8 156 20 near_similar 6|164,6|158,5|136 0 WolfgangSladkowski^:^Sengkang https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Asian_civilisations_museums_singapore.jpg^:^https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Asian_Civilisations_Museum,_Empress_Place_27,_Aug_06.JPG Singapore
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