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"Presidential Artifacts"
President Wilson lived in this Georgian-Revival house after he left office, creating a comfortable, unpretentious residence with his second wife, Edith. He is the only president to remain in Washington after office. The couple collected items from all over the world, filling their home with eclectic wares. There is a baseball signed by Great Britain's King George V and a silent movie projector given to the Wilsons by the actor Douglas Fairbanks. The bedroom is modeled after the couple's White House sleeping quarters.
2340 S Street NW, Washington, DC, United States, 20008
Today: 10:00 AM - 04:00 PM Closed Now
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Tuesday to Sunday 10:00 AM to 04:00 PM
"Presidential Artifacts"
President Wilson lived in this Georgian-Revival house after he left office, creating a comfortable, unpretentious residence with his second wife, Edith. He is the only president to remain in Washington after office. The couple collected items from all over the world, filling their home with eclectic wares. There is a baseball signed by Great Britain's King George V and a silent movie projector given to the Wilsons by the actor Douglas Fairbanks. The bedroom is modeled after the couple's White House sleeping quarters.
What's nearby?
Woodrow Wilson House

1
Textile Museum
2
Kalorama House and Embassy Tour
3
Embassy Circle Guest House
4
Embassy of Greece
5
Spanish Steps
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2340 S Street NW
Washington, DC, United States, 20008
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Nestled in the picturesque Kalorama neighborhood, Spanish Steps were constructed as a part of the City Beautiful Movement. This movement was an architectural reform movement in the United States of America during the late 1800s which encouraged architects to beautify the city by adding impressive structures to it. Robert E. Cook, a local architect, took inspirations from the Spanish Steps located in Rome and designed this beautiful structure in 1911. There is an elegant lion-head fountain at the top of the stairs which also promises splendid views of the city.

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Embassy row is another name for the part of Massachusetts Avenue where many of the foreign embassies are located. A tour along the avenue will unfold some interesting architectural masterpieces. This is considered as one of the upscale areas and houses some premier properties. Considered as one of the prime locations, the properties here were owned by prominent social and political elite. The Hilton Washington Embassy Row and The Westin Embassy Row are the two major accommodation options located on this stretch.

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This palatial townhouse on Embassy Row is a showpiece of the collections, interests, and lavish decor of Ambassador Lars Anderson and his heiress wife, Isabel. Housing an exhibit of revolutionary artifacts, the museum also offers some quirkier displays such as murals of Anderson's favorite motorcar tours of the city. But the biggest draw is the decor, which, from the grand ballroom to the original furnishings, gives a clear sense of how the cream of society once lived. Free chamber recitals are performed weekly.

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This fine, dignified Georgian mansion, built in the 1800s, was long a centerpiece of Georgetown society. Local lore has it that Dolley Madison watched the White House burn during the War of 1812 from this hilltop home. It is now a showplace of graceful early 19th Century architecture, elegant period furnishings and lovely gardens. The mansion is the headquarters of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. The house is now a museum dedicated to the Federal Period.

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With its funky shops and trendy restaurants and bars, Dupont Circle is one of the hippest neighborhoods in Washington. Its cosmopolitan air draws visitors both young and old. Once a neighborhood of old money and the nouveau riche, Dupont Circle today is home to artists, intellectuals and young professionals. The neighborhood's turn-of-the-century mansions and brownstones, formerly home to prominent families, today house art museums, restaurants, embassies and fun shops. Dupont Circle is also home to the Phillips Collection, one of the city's foremost art museums with paintings by Renoir, Degas and Cézanne.

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This extravagant mansion is the legacy of a local immigrant success story. Christian Heurich, a German orphan, made his fortune in beer. His 31-room home, lavish and eccentric, is full of turrets, onyx fireplaces and the furnishings used by he and his family in the 20th Century. Victorian excess, carved wood and a lovely garden make the property a must-see for fans of design and architecture. There are walking tours of the Mansion and the Victorian Garden on the property.

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The Washington Club was founded in 1891 for “literary purposes, mutual improvement and the promotion of social intercourse.” The Washington Club was the first women's organization to be included in the D.C. area. Men were not involved in the club until 1979. The Club's extensive library, one of its most well-known features, is a collection of books from its members, and many extraneous books have been donated to hospitals, schools, and the Library of Congress. The Club has changed location several times because of its growing size, eventually moving to its current location in 1951. The Club hosts many guest speakers that cover a wide range of interesting topics, as well as other events like Bridge Marathons and book discussions for the literary minds.

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0,8 326 41 near_similar 5|136,5|137 0 dbking https://www.flickr.com/photos/bootbearwdc/2542873541 United States
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