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Best Landmarks in Boston

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The Brewster's Island is a three-acre expanse of land that is a Coast Guard navigational aid. Climb the 76 stairs and the two ladders to reach the top of the Boston Light on the island, which is the oldest running lighthouse in the country. Cruise out to this island for some adventure but make sure you don't take your pets along as they are not permitted here.

Located on Margin Street, US Post Office-Salem Main was built in 1932. Inspired by the Colonial Revival style of architecture it also features motifs inspired by the Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles. Designed by architects Hadley Smith and Robert Walker, the beautiful structure was added to the US National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

This world-famous baseball stadium has been a staple of the Boston entertainment scene since its opening in 1912. The diamond is flanked on its left side by the Green Monster, an iconic 37-foot (11.28-meter) field wall featuring a manually operated scoreboard. A unique piece of civic history, Fenway Park is one of the oldest Major League Baseball stadiums currently in use, and it proudly hosts the Boston Red Sox. With a seating capacity of over 37,000 spectators, the stadium ripples with excited energy on game days when steadfast local fans cheer proudly for the home team.

Just across Charles Street from the Boston Common, Public Garden is elegantly landscaped with flower beds, lagoons, walking paths and statues, including a notable monument of George Washington on a horse. Admire the natural beauty and watch as couples pose for their wedding photographs on most summer weekends. The children's story 'Make Way for Ducklings' took place here, and there is a popular sculpture of the ducklings in the northeast corner of the park. A ride on their famous Swan Boats is an essential experience for visitors.

With an antique brick facade set among downtown skyscrapers, any passerby can pick this building out as a relic from an earlier time. Now a museum run by The Bostonian Society, the site has a long and distinguished history. The Boston Massacre, one of the catalysts for the American Revolution, took place just outside. The Declaration of Independence was first read to Boston here on July 18, 1776. The structure served as the new state's capitol until 1797. Exhibits at the museum take visitors through the stories of the revolution and the people involved in them. Check website for more.

The United States Lightship Nantucket is a historic landmark, having served as one of the last of its kind. It was of great historic significance to eminent vessels such as SS United States, RMS Queen Mary and SS Normandie. It has guided transoceanic shipping from the U.S. east coast ports for as many as 39 years. Decades later, the need to preserve and save this unique historic and venerable vessel was undertaken.

Boston Harbor is a natural harbor of the Massachusetts Bay. In 1614, Captain John Smith discovered the harbor and it quickly became an important American port, becoming the import point of most goods from England to the New World. Due to its importance to trade between the two continents the harbor was chosen as the location for the infamous Boston Tea Party in 1773, one of the key events leading directly to the American Revolutionary War. Its shores are dotted with a system of shining beacons, with the lighthouses of Boston, Lovells Island Range, Nixes Mate, Spectacle Island Range Light being some of the harbor's finest.

It is said that it was here that the first blood was drawn during the American Revolution in the 1700s. The Lexington Battle Green is the site of the opening shots of this historic event. The Battle Green, located in the heart of the city, plays host to the re-enactment of the battle held every year. It is a popular attraction among locals and tourists alike.

For a breathtaking view of the city and surrounding area, take a trip to this Skywalk Observatory, perched on the 50th floor of the soaring Prudential Tower. The windows here offer breathtaking vista of Boston in all directions. On a clear day, visitors can see the mountains of New Hampshire. Museum-like displays offer detailed information on the history of Boston. Check website for more.

The House of the Seven Gables is a 17th Century Salem mansion which inspired even the famous novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne in her work of the same name. Also named the Turner-Ingersoll mansion, Seven Gables refers to its seven triangular points above the roof line. Built in 1688, this house contains a hidden staircase and is located on Salem Harbor. The house where Hawthorne was born has been moved to this property and can also be seen.

The Massachusetts State House is a prestigious landmark in the state capital. This 6.7-acre (2.7-hectare) complex is home to the Massachusetts General Court as well as the Governor’s office. The highlight of its architecture is its gilded dome gleaming under the sun. The pinnacle of the dome is a pine cone, a reminder of both the importance of Boston's lumber industry during the colonial period, and the state of Maine, which was a former district of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The rich embedded past of this building makes it an essential feature on tourist itineraries.

Paul Revere was a Boston native and local silversmith renowned for his role in the American Revolution. On a night back in 1775, he left home to warn fellow rebels Sam Adams and John Hancock that British troops were headed to Lexington to arrest them. That night was immortalized by Longfellow's poem, "Paul Revere's Ride." The house was built in 1680 and bought by Revere in 1770. It just escaped the wrecking ball when Revere's descendants recovered the property in 1902. Now a national historic landmark, the building is one of the oldest in downtown Boston and reminiscent of colonial America. It opened its doors to public-viewing and displays an unique assortment of personal belongings and memorabilia.

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