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Must Visit Attractions in Boston

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A beautiful structure constructed from Milford granite and inspired by the Merton College Chapel in Oxford, the Bancroft Memorial Library is famed not only for its lovely collection of books but also for the intricate details in the building itself. The ceiling boasts a wonderful medley of exposed beams and intricate carvings while the walls are lined with classic photographs of iconic people from yesteryear. The amazing collection of antiques, and dark and spooky corners add to the special touch in this storybook library. The library is open Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00p to 8:00p, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:00a to 5:00p, Fridays from 1:00p to 5:00p and Saturdays from 10:00a to 2:00p.

This world-famous baseball stadium has been a staple of the Boston entertainment scene since its opening in 1912. The diamond is flanked on its left side by the Green Monster, an iconic 37-foot (11.28-meter) field wall featuring a manually operated scoreboard. A unique piece of civic history, Fenway Park is one of the oldest Major League Baseball stadiums currently in use, and it proudly hosts the Boston Red Sox. With a seating capacity of over 37,000 spectators, the stadium ripples with excited energy on game days when steadfast local fans cheer proudly for the home team.

Boston Common is one of America's oldest park in the heart of Boston, offering recreation opportunities and a glimpse into history through numerous monuments from the past. Designated as a public space in the 1640s, British soldiers later camped here during the Revolutionary War. Part of the Freedom Trail, the park adjoins the Massachusetts State House and Beacon Hill. A favorite spot is the Frog Pond, which doubles as an ice skating rink. The park is the beginning of the Emerald Necklace, a seven-mile (12-kilometer) string of local parks designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, a popular landscape architect.

President John F. Kennedy's memory is sacred in the minds of many Americans. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum, a glass pavilion designed by Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, is dedicated to his memory. Visitors are transported back to the darkest days of the Cold War. A short film recounts JFK's deeds in his own words while the authentic photos and exhibits evoke the brief period in White House history that nostalgic Americans refer to as "the days of Camelot".

This large pond was carved out by glaciers during the last Ice Age. Unusually deep and cold, Jamaica Pond is linked via underground channels to other bodies of water along the Jamaicaway. The park features one path for walkers and runners and another path for cyclists. During the summer months, you can rent a rowboat or sailboat, or you can fish for trout, bass, salmon and perch. Besides these activities, city folks also flock to Jamaican Pond for theater performances, concerts and children programs.

With antique brick facade set among downtown skyscrapers, any passerby can pick this building out as a relic from an earlier time. Now a museum run by The Bostonian Society, the site has a long and distinguished history. The Boston Massacre, one of the catalysts for the American Revolution, took place just outside. The Declaration of Independence was first read to Boston here on July 18, 1776. The structure served as the new state's capital until 1797. Exhibits at the museum take visitors through the stories of the revolution and the people involved in them.

An integral artery of downtown Boston, Freedom Trail is a winding path coursing through some of the most significant landmarks of the country. Dotted along the trail's course is a troupe of sites which have been the brewing grounds for iconic events like the Boston Tea Party and Paul Revere's Midnight Ride. Upheld by the Boston National Historic Park and the Freedom Trail Commission, it is dotted by a tracery of churches, graveyards and buildings commanding monumental significance. Some of the important sites studded on the trail are the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, Old North Church, Old South Meeting House, USS Constitution, Copp's Hill Burial Ground and Paul Revere's House. The trail often commences from Boston Common, meandering up to the Bunker Hill Monument. Voyaging proudly through the city's expanse, the Freedom Trail tells stirring tales of the country's glorious past.

Still an active Episcopalian church, Old North Church is possibly the oldest religious structure in Boston, dating back to 1723. It occupies a special place in American history. On a fateful night in 1775, Paul Revere watched for the signal, “one if by land and two if by sea.” After the church sexton hung two lanterns from the steeple, he began his famous midnight ride to wake and warn the countryside of the British troops' arrival. Every April, members of the colonial militia begin a lantern service commemorating this historic event.

Steeped in history, this is one of Boston's most beautiful neighborhoods. Home to statesmen, artists and intellectuals, "The Hill" is also the site of the State House, which is the beginning of the Freedom Trail. Lovely cafes and majestic brownstone buildings line the narrow, cobblestoned streets next to the Boston Common, America's oldest urban park. At the bottom of the hill, along Charles Street, are several antique shops and boutiques to pick up unique souvenirs. This charming neighborhood has managed to preserve its history without becoming artificially quaint. Another important and most visited feature of Boston is Acorn Street. This street is surrounded by beautiful colonial-style houses, giving it an earthy feel, which will transport you to the era gone by.

Any shopper will enjoy a stroll down this street, which features eight blocks of upscale boutiques, shops, restaurants, cafes and bars. On warm weekends, the sidewalks are teeming with window shoppers, street performers and overflowing outdoor cafes. Located in the historic Back Bay, much of the brownstone architecture is influenced by the Art Nouveau style of the 1920s. In addition, chic galleries and restaurants, such as Stephanie's on Newbury, attracts a well-dressed, sophisticated crowd.

Spread out around the picturesque Boston Harbor, this acclaimed national recreation area is made up of 34 independent islands and peninsulas. This pristine area covers roughly 1482 acres (599.7 hectares) and allows visitors to truly absorb Boston's underrated natural beauty. An outdoor enthusiast's dream come true, the park offers an impressive selection of activities from beachside camping and hiking to kayaking, swimming and fishing. The islands are also home to a myriad of heritage sights like the Fort Warren, dating back the times of the Civil War and the oldest lighthouse the country, the 18th-century Boston Light. To access the recreational area, just hop on the harbor ferries that depart from Quincy, Hingham, Downtown Boston and Hull. Park rangers are usually on board the vessels and will be more than happy to assist you with your trip.

The Old South Meeting House was originally built as a church by Puritans in 1729. This building went on to play an important role in the American Revolution as a gathering point for those seeking American independence from Britain. On December 16, 1773, over 5000 colonists met here to protest a tea tax. From the meeting, these protesters went to the waterfront and tossed crates of tea into the harbor. The act later came to be known as the Boston Tea Party. An in-house shop in the museum basement has small articles of the historic events that occurred here, as well as copies of books and documents of historical importance.

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