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Strangest Attractions in Detroit

By: Cityseeker
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Dequindre Cut Greenway

This urban pathway winds it's way through residential neighborhoods, the Eastern Market and the Riverfront area. Below street level and almost a mile and a half long, the Dequindre Cut Greenway is known for its urban graffiti artwork and unique sights along the way. The pathway is paved spanning 20 feet across with separate areas for both bikers and pedestrians. Entrance ramps down to the pathway can be found Gratiot Avenue, Woodbridge Street and Lafayette Street. Benches, stretches of grass and even street performers can be found along the way.

Detroit, MI, United States
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The Masonic Temple

The largest Masonic Temple in the world, this ornate building opened in 1926. For decades its 5000-seat, acoustically rich and intimate auditorium served as Detroit's choicest venue for concerts, opera and plays. The impressive building has 1037 rooms, including ten decorative period lodge rooms; a Scottish Rite Cathedral that seats around 1500 people and has rich ceiling carvings and colors, and a huge drill hall with a floating floor laid atop felt cushions. It is truly a Detroit landmark.

Detroit, MI, United States
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Elmwood Cemetery

As one of the oldest cemeteries in all of Michigan, the Elmwood Cemetery has been around since 1846. The cemetery began on a modest stretch of 42 acres (16.99 hectares), doubling in size over the years to a sprawling 86 acres (34.8 hectares). Lush vegetation and majestic groves of towering trees make this a serene and peaceful place to visit. You can see a special memorial for Civil War soldiers where a flag is flown continuously in their honor. Other notable memorials include famous governors, mayors, abolitionists, prominent businessmen and many others. The beautiful garden which surrounds these graves has been awarded a Level I accreditation by the Morton Arboretum and the ArbNet Arboretum Accreditation Program. To truly recognize the historic significance of the cemetery, go on one of the two free Tombstone Tales Guided Walking Tours.

Detroit, MI, United States
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The Heidelberg Project

For a unique art experience, check out The Heidelberg Project (HP). Started as a way to introduce art to a rundown, underprivileged neighborhood, it is now a growing movement to beautify and add art to local low-income communities. On Heidelberg Street you will find a stretch of painted houses and yards that each take on a different artistic theme. A lot of the homes recycle trash and turn it into art installations. The best way to experience The Heidelberg Project is to park and simply walk the street yourself.

Detroit, MI, United States
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Belle Isle Aquarium

This gorgeous aquarium was built in 1904 by well-known architect, Albert Khan. It was the oldest continuously open aquarium in the United States until 2005 when it was closed. Reopened in 2012, the aquarium has flourished with the help of various organizations that merged to become the Belle Isle Conservancy. Steeped in history, the Belle Isle Aquarium is housed in a beautiful Beaux Arts style building with a grand entrance that incorporates the Detroit emblem and two spitting fish in a stone facade. The viewing gallery offers large tanks teeming with aquatic life, a swordfish mosaic, and an arched ceiling tiled in sea foam glass tiles reminiscent of being underwater. Both saltwater and fresh water species are found here, most notably native fish from the Great Lakes area.

Detroit, MI, United States
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Russell Industrial Center

Russell Industrial Center is a unique center that includes several building and is known as one of the top artistic venues in the Midwest. The outside still looks like an old manufacturing factory, but inside you'll discover over 100 artists' workshops. From trendy art studios to unique boutiques, you'll find this center houses some of the most creative people in the city. Russell Industrial Center also hosts top events including art shows and exhibitions.

Detroit, MI, United States
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Detroit Chimera Graffiti Mural

This giant graffiti urban mural can be found standing proud on the Russell's Industrial Center's building number two. Measuring over 8,750 square feet, the mural is so big that it can be seen from Interstate 75. Depicting a towering Chimera, a mythological creature, the lion hybrid with wings and mechanical features is a testament to Detroit's spirit and history. The piece was commissioned by the Russell Industrial Center and was created by the talented artist, Kobie Solomon.

Detroit, MI, United States
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Hamtramck Disneyland

What started out as a hobby for a retired General Motors employee is now deemed to be Disneyland of Hamtramck. Dmytro Szylak started this folk art display as a personal project in his backyard in 1992, collecting and creating artwork from metal scraps and unused objects. Some pieces from this eclectic collage are wired and move when plugged in, making it look like an amusement park for gnomes and elves. Vivid, bright to the point of being vague, this truly amusing site is hard to describe given the sheer size of the display. Located on the Klinger street this place is hard to miss as the colorful collection of random things tower over 30 feet (9.14 meters) high.

Hamtramck, MI, United States
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Giant Cow Head

Located on the Mack Avenue in East Detroit, the Ira Wilson & Sons Dairy was known for more than its ice cream and dairy products, mainly for the giant cow head atop its building. Although the dairy place has been closed for a long time now, the cow head continues to amuse people on the road, even inspiring some photographers along the way.

Detroit, MI, United States
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The Uniroyal Tire

One of the most popular roadside attractions in the United States, Uniroyal Giant Tire has been a landmark for decades. Located on Interstate 94, near the airport, the mammoth tire was built as a Ferris wheel for New York World Fair in 1964. With a seating capacity of 96 people, the giant wheel catered to more than two million people that year, including Jacqueline Kennedy. It was later moved to Allen Park, where it still stands about eight stories high, drawing many tourists each year.

Allen Park, MI, United States
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