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Best Landmarks in Grand Canyon

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Closely interwoven bands of layered rock skirt a sea of gigantic ancient boulders, coming together to form a surreal panorama that melts into Arizona's vast landscape. From high above the topmost point of the canyon, the mighty Colorado River appears as a muddy sliver, belying the tumultuous nature of its waters that carved through ancient layers of rock and birthed the steep canyons surrounding it. Over several millennia, the river snaked its way through the rugged landscape, constantly deepening and pushing the edges of the canyon, oblivious that its aggressive course unraveled years of geological history. For years, the canyon was home to indigenous Native American tribes, before Spanish explorers and American trappers settled into the river basin. Today, the Grand Canyon continues to instill a deep sense of wonder and mystique in whoever visits it, an eternal ocean of auburn rock that spreads majestically under deep blue skies.

Formed over millions of years, this national monument extends for more than 294,000 acres and it is considered by most geologists to be a geologic treasure. With the towering cliffs, deep canyons and fantastic sandstone formations inside the Paria Plateau, Coyote Buttes and Paria Canyon. One of the most popular attractions in the area is The Wave, however to visit you will need a permit to hike the Coyote Buttes North, the Coyote Buttes South, or stay overnight in Paria Canyon.

This National Historical Landmark rests at the end of the West Rim Drive. Named for the French Canadian prospector, Louis Boucher, who lived alone in the area for more than 20 years, the site holds the impressive limestone building designed by the renowned Grand Canyon architect Mary Colter in 1914. Bikers and hikers find their way to Hermit's Rest, as well as those who take the shuttles in the summertime or drive their own vehicles during the rest of the year. There is also a snack bar, a gift shop, restrooms and water.

Nestled into the canyon's edge at Bright Angel Lodge, this stone facility blends into the landscape, as it provides panoramic views and endless photo opportunities. Designed by architect Mary Colter, it opened around 1914, and was a place where early visitors could warm themselves by the fireplace, shop for postcards and use a telescope to view the surrounding area. Today it continues to offer visitors a bird's eye view of the majestic landscape and a place to shop for rock and fossil specimens, souvenirs, photography artwork and books.

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