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Best Historic Locations in Halifax

, 13 Options Found

Old Burying Ground was the first cemetery to be opened in 1749 and for many decades was a non-denominational burial site for the citizens of Halifax. In 1793, it was handed over to St. Paul's Anglican Church and for nearly a century of service, it closed down in 1844 when the Camp Hill Cemetery replaced the Old Burying Ground. This national historic site was in neglect till the 1980s when the Old Burying Ground Foundation restored it. With around 1,300 tombstones and 12,000 graves, it has some famous dead resting in its grounds. The most notable structure of the cemetery, the Welsford-Parker Monument stands at its entrance. This is the only war memorial commemorating the Crimean War in the continent and the second oldest of its kind in the nation.

The 'Last Corvette', HMCS Sackville is a memorial to all who served in the Canadian Navy. During World War II she spent her time escorting convoys to Ireland and met with quite a few adventures. Visitors are welcome aboard each summer to explore the fully restored ship, which is docked just behind the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. A stamp commemorating the vessel was brought into circulation in 1998 and it was later even used as a model for a popular mainstream movie.

The Halifax Citadel is one of the most popular attractions in Canada. The citadel that stands today on the aptly named Citadel Hill is actually the fourth fort to sit on the site. The first citadel on the site was constructed in 1749, although it was not in the form of the citadel we see today. The current star-shaped fort was built in 1856 and took 28 years to complete. In its history, the citadel never suffered an attack and many of the original 1856 features are still preserved today. A visit to the Army Museum includes watching 'The Tides of History', and experiencing the day-to-day life of a soldier or his wife in the mid-Victorian era. Concerts are sometimes organized at the garrison grounds here.

In Eastern Passage there is a village that you must see. Restored to its original look and feel, Fisherman's Cove is a place where residents still fish for lobster. Wander the boardwalk and explore the little shops for some local art and crafts. Have lunch at one of the smaller take-outs or indulge in a larger meal at Boondocks Dining Room and Lounge. As the sun comes down, Fisherman's Cove becomes a perfect spot to enjoy a cold beer while you take in the beautifully painted evening sky.

The Fairview Lawn Cemetery is one of the most significant and historic cemeteries in the city. When the Titanic went down on 12 April 1912, Halifax was the closest port and of the 209 bodies recovered, about 129 were buried here. Five years later, Halifax was host to another tragedy: the Halifax Explosion. Nearly 2000 perished in the disaster and many are interred here. Located just north of the city's business and industrial districts, the Fairview Lawn Cemetery is a major stop for the curious and those interested in the historical disasters.

York Redoubt is a fort system with strategic views of the Halifax Harbor, near the city of Halifax in Nova Scotia. The lookout has been in use since more than a century, and during important events such as the World War II, when it was used by the military. Today, the complex includes the remnants of the Martello tower and a collection of cannons and other artillery. Visitors can view these monumental pieces of history while soaking in panoramic views of the harbor and indulging in recreational activities.

Also known as the Old Town Clock or Citadel Clock Tower, the Halifax Town Clock was proposed by Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, around 1800. It began working in 1803 and served the British Army and Royal Navy garrison at Halifax, which, according to Prince Edward, was prone to tardiness. Now a beloved landmark, the Halifax Town Clock continues to help the citizens of Halifax keep time to this day. Visitors will find the town clock on the east slope of Citadel Hill, watching over Nova Scotia's charming capital.

Between 1928 and 1971, one million immigrants reached Canada via Pier 21. This immigration facility played a hugely important role in Canadian immigration in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, many comparing it to New York's Ellis Island. Tens of thousands of war brides, refugees and displaced persons first glimpsed their new world from this pier in Halifax. In 1988, restoration of this essential port of entry began. Today, visitors can examine the exhibits and trace their connections to those immigrants. At the south end of the harbor, Pier 21 is easily accessible to the downtown area via the waterfront walkway. Part of the pier is occupied by The Canadian Museum of Immigration, which has an impressive collection of documents, photographs, and other artifacts related to the immigration and the Second World War.

Built on the site where Dalhousie Univeristy once stood, Halifax City Hall is a municipal building constructed between 1887 and 1890. It was designed by Edward Elliot, and its architecture features an eclectic mix of late-Victorian and Second Empire influences. Halifax City Hall is one of the oldest and largest buildings in Novia Scotia, and since 1997, it has been cherished as a National Historic Site. Visitors should not miss this three-story attraction and its impressive seven-story clock tower.

If you are looking to shop on your tour to Canada, Historic Properties is a must-visit place. Alternatively known as Privateers' Wharf, the Historic Properties is a group of about ten warehouses that were constructed around the 19th Century. This space is a one-stop-shop for all your shopping needs. Be it fashion, beauty or art, this place has it all. Housing popular stores like Carrefour, Bounty Fashion and many more, this place has something for everyone. After the exhaustive shopping, you can enjoy delectable delicacies at the various restaurants that the property has.

Originally from Scotland, Alexander Keith migrated to Canada and began running this brewery in the 1800s. Learn the art of making your favorite beverage as you stroll through Alexander Keith's Brewery which is known for producing some of the finest ales in the country. The tour narrates the details of the brewing process back then with the help of some actors dressed like people from the 19th Century. Beer is served on the tour, while for non-drinkers, alternatives to beer are served. Located in a wonderful old building, The Brewery Market, this is a tour for all ale fans. Timings and hours vary seasonally. Summer tours run every half hour and winter/Spring tours run every hour. Each tour lasts around fifty minutes. Tours are arranged at a charge; the brewery also arranges group events.

Lunenburg is a port town known for its naval and fishing heritage. It was established in 1753, just four years after Halifax, Nova Scotia's capital. The town's rich history and vibrant architecture earned it a UNESCO World Heritage Site designation in 1995, and today, Lunenburg is cherished as an example of an early British colonial settlement. It sports a scenic waterfront sprinkled with brightly-colored buildings that overlook the intense blue of the surrounding Back Harbor. Between its historic town center, gorgeous port, small town charm, and many local businesses, this increasingly popular tourist destination definitely warrants a day trip.

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