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Best Free Sites in Nashville

, 9 Options Found

Set in the luscious hills of Davidson County, this tourist hot spot is as close as you can get to natural wilderness. Go on a hiking trail in the forest area or catch the wildlife in its most natural form. If you're lucky, you may be able to observe some of the rarest species of wild birds here. Don't forget to see some of the most exotic floral wonders the park features. The sprawling 85-acre (34.398-hectare) lake provides the perfect centerpiece for this tourist haven, which is at its best in autumn. They have a strict no-dogs, no-jogging and no-biking policy, though it is allowed on Otter Creek Road. Radnor Lake State Natural Area is open to the public everyday starting at 6am.

Centrally located, the Nashville Public Library offers the residents of the city a treasure trove of books that span genres and ages. The building of the library itself is a symbol of architectural marvel. Designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, this building has won a national design competition, and it gracefully blends functionality with beauty. As the main location of the network of public libraries in the city, this branch is appointed with several facilities, including an art gallery, meeting rooms, study rooms, a computer classroom, and has Wireless Internet. Besides the massive collection of books, the library also plays host to a range of cultural events, like concerts, exhibitions and much more. For more information, do see the website.

This 19-acre (7.69 hectares) park was built in 1996 to commemorate Tennessee's 200 years of statehood. Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park provides wonderful views of the city and features a 200-feet (60.96 meters) granite map of Tennessee, which is bordered by thirty-one fountains that represent all of the state's rivers. There is also a massive granite time-line documenting Tennessee's history, a 2,000-seat amphitheater, botanical garden, and visitor center. Restrooms, a gift shop and restaurants are adjacent to the park.

This serene 42 mile long, 14,000 acre lake was created thanks to the J. Percy Priest Dam, completed in 1968. A convenient 15 minute drive from downtown Nashville makes this lake popular among outdoor enthusiasts. The vast array of recreational activities include boating, fishing, swimming, camping, hiking, biking, horse back riding and much, much more. With marinas located around the lake, boaters will find easy access to the water.

The Nashville Public Square spreads over 5 acres and is possibly the most visited spot in the city. With a great central location, this square has a colossal underground parking lot which serves both impressed visitors and court house employees. Large lawns and fountains add to the beauty and provide a beautiful backdrop, especially on concert days.

Once the former location of Nashville's publishing and printing industry, Printers Alley has now become the city's epicenter for nightlife. A sign, extending across Church Street, marks the entrance to this brick-paved, bar-lined alleyway. Neon signage lights up the evenings, beckoning customers. From restaurants to live music bars, Printers Alley is filled with unique and interesting nightlife gems and is even known to be a prime spot where great musicians have performed and gotten their big breaks.

Built in 1862, Fort Negley is an inland fort believed to be one of the largest in the country. Covering over 180,000 square feet (16723 square meter), this all-stone structure did not serve a military purpose post the Battle of Nashville. For the longest time post World War II, entry to the fort was restricted. Later, a restoration project to conserve the adjoining wooded area of the fort was undertaken by local authorities in 2000. And, a visitors center was incorporated into the structure in 2007. Interactive exhibits, a video montage, and tour guides entertain visitors at the Fort Negley Park and Visitors Center which is open for visits at no admission fee.

Perched atop a prominent hill, this magnificent whitewashed building presides over downtown Nashville's skyline with indubitable grace and finesse. Constructed between 1845 to 1859 by well-renowned architect William Strickland, the structure's design is a stunning specimen of exquisite Greek-Revival architecture. What makes the building really unique is the fact that it is one of only ten capitol buildings to not feature a dome. The building's neoclassical facade is perhaps one of its most salient features that effortlessly captivates onlookers with its assemblage of elegant Corinthian stanchions and pronounced neoclassical rooftop. The facade's beauty is enhanced quite drastically at night when its sharp edges are highlighted by a series of ambient lights. Its interiors are equally as impressive, with the governor's house chamber being the building's centerpiece.

Athena stands 42 feet tall, towering above all who enter her temple through seven-ton bronze doors. Daughter of Zeus and patron goddess of wisdom and arts, her presence amidst Nashville's university and arts communities is appropriate. Other classical and modern works of art surround Athena. Her Parthenon and grounds, Centennial Park, are favorite spots for visitors to stroll or relax after a long day of site seeing.

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