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Best Landmarks in New Haven

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This 14-foot, three sided bronze relief was erected in 1992 to commemorate the the captives of the Amistad and their incredible story. The sculpture stands on the site of the former jail in which they were imprisoned, and depicts Senghe Pieh (better known as Joseph Cinque), the leader of the revolt that started their amazing journey. The three sides of the relief depict the three parts of his story, from before his capture, to his trial, and finally home again.

Famously known as the "most beautiful street in America," the Hillhouse Avenue Historic District is a site that spreads over 18 acres of land. With several traditional homes located here dating to the 19th-century, the site also features homes of some renowned people. The site is worth a visit to watch the beautiful elite constructions of New Haven.

The Congregational United Church of Christ, as it is more formally known, has stood on the New Haven Green since 1639. The current Georgian structure dates to 1812. Architect Ithiel Town incorporated large windows into the design to capture sunshine, as there was no heating system. A beautiful Tiffany window, installed in 1890, depicts the Rev. John Davenport leading the first service in the new colony. The historic crypt contains the remains of Benedict Arnold's first wife. There is a small burial ground behind the church, where regicide John Dixwell is laid to rest.

Take a 20-minute drive east to Hammonasset to enjoy year-round shoreline vistas and a boardwalk for long walks and relaxation. Offering 1000 acres of campgrounds (550 sites), parks, beaches, walking trails, bike paths and fields for kite flying, Hammonasset is the quintessential pleasure destination. Meigs Point Nature Center offers fresh and saltwater aquariums and live reptiles and amphibians to touch and enjoy. Pack your in-line skates or bike, the park is grand.

Follow your nose to the most distinct district of downtown New Haven. Wooster Street was the center of New Haven's Italian community prior to the construction of I-91 and I-95 that rip right through the heart of the street. Today, Wooster Street is host to New Haven's finest and most renowned Italian restaurants, with the famous Pepe's and Sally's pizzerie. A few blocks up is the famed Lucibello's Italian pastry shop where you can taste all your favorite Neapolitan sweets. Wooster Street is the best part of town to explore and get a great meal.

Located in New Haven's historic and vibrant downtown area, and bordered by Yale University, Chapel Street and the eponymous historic district that surrounds it have been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1984. Take a stroll down the street to check out the plethora of architectural styles represented here in one of New Haven's most well known areas. Nowadays most of the buildings date from the 18th Century through the 20th Century.

Located in New Haven's scenic Lighthouse Point Park, this historic carousel dates back to 1916. With over 70 characters to choose from, as well as two chariots, you can take a spin on ornate horses and camels. Make sure you look out for George Washington conducting the orchestra as you make your way around. No trip to this park is complete without a ride on the carousel.

Founded in 1943, Fairfield University is one of the nation's leading small, liberal arts colleges, conveniently located between New York City and New Haven. There are lovely buildings on campus, including Egan Chapel (a modern church dedicated to St. Ignatius Loyola) and The Quick Center (a performing arts facility). Also on campus, is the boys high school, Fairfield Prep. It is a member of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and the campus offers lovely views of Long Island Sound from the hillside.

A piece of Connecticut's remarkable history, Fort Nathan Hale chronicles myriad tales of the iconic Revolutionary and Civil wars. Fort Nathan Hale is a recreation of a military fort called Black Rock Fort from the Revolutionary War that was built in 1776 in order to protect the area from the British, although the fort ended up being captured anyway in 1779. Having faced the many ravages of time, the fort was rebuilt as Fort Nathan Hale, again, as a defense against the British in the War of 1812. Today, the fort is housed in a rolling, eponymous park, named after Connecticut's official state hero. Perched on the shores of New Haven Harbor, this antiquated site features a tapestry of monuments like the statue of Nathan Hale, a powder magazine and a memorial court where replicas of colonial-era flags flutter in all their glory. Enlisted on the National Register of Historic Places, this historic site has established itself as an unforgettable landmark of Connecticut.

One of the most renowned institutions of higher learning in the world, the Yale University has been in New Haven since 1718, while its collegiate school had already been established by 1701. Since inception, its campus has been a dream revered by many aspiring learners, and it continues to shine on the educational horizons of ambitious students across the world. A distinguished embodiment of academic prowess, the Ivy League institution has produced more than 50 Nobel laureates over the centuries. . Many notable people call Yale their Alma Mater, including William Howard Taft, Bill Clinton, and Meryl Streep. On campus, one can effortlessly spot many famous sights such as the prestigious Yale Center for British Art, the Beinecke Rare Book Library, the Collection of Musical Instruments, and the Old Campus that allures students and visitors, alike. The university is home to the illustrious multiple championship-winning NCAA Division I Yale Bulldogs athletic team.

This greenway and trail started out as a canal when it was first built in the 1820s. Since then, it has gone from canal, to railway line, to finally this park and greenway trail that leads from New Haven to Northampton. Much of the trail is paved for all kinds of recreation including hiking, running and biking.

This schooner is a recreation of the tall ship La Amistad that was the site of the mutiny by illegally captured Africans on their voyage to America. The ship was built using all traditional methods and techniques to make the replica as authentic as possible. Tours of the ship are available which inform visitors of the story of the ship, and the ship serves as both classroom and monument as well.

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