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by Spatms

"African-American Culture and Jazz"

New Orleans has long been revered for its vibrant culture and unique identity, born of an amalgamation of different cultures, traditions and beliefs. While slaves were granted little freedom, they were usually permitted free time on Sundays and would often congregate in open spaces and public squares to celebrate their native traditions. So far from their homeland and all that was familiar to them, these men and women found solace in these weekly celebrations and gatherings, preserving their traditions and way of life for future generations. Although this practice dates back to the 18th Century, in 1817 Congo Square was officially granted for use by slaves and freedmen. For many years hence the square lay at the heart of the slaves' cultural world; a place where they could gather, set up market, dance and practice voodoo. Today, drum circles, dance performances, concerts and other cultural events are still hosted at the square every Sunday, alongside celebrations, festivals and special events like the annual Red Dress Run. Congo Square has played an important role in the early development of African-American culture as it is today and is revered by musicians the world over for its place in the history of jazz music.
700 North Rampart Street, Louis Armstrong Park, New Orleans, LA, United States, 70116
Today: Closed Now
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Winter - Monday to Sunday 08:00 AM to 06:00 PM
Summer - Monday to Sunday 08:00 AM to 07:00 PM
"African-American Culture and Jazz"
New Orleans has long been revered for its vibrant culture and unique identity, born of an amalgamation of different cultures, traditions and beliefs. While slaves were granted little freedom, they were usually permitted free time on Sundays and would often congregate in open spaces and public squares to celebrate their native traditions. So far from their homeland and all that was familiar to them, these men and women found solace in these weekly celebrations and gatherings, preserving their traditions and way of life for future generations. Although this practice dates back to the 18th Century, in 1817 Congo Square was officially granted for use by slaves and freedmen. For many years hence the square lay at the heart of the slaves' cultural world; a place where they could gather, set up market, dance and practice voodoo. Today, drum circles, dance performances, concerts and other cultural events are still hosted at the square every Sunday, alongside celebrations, festivals and special events like the annual Red Dress Run. Congo Square has played an important role in the early development of African-American culture as it is today and is revered by musicians the world over for its place in the history of jazz music.
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near_similar 5|141,7|188|1176,7|184 0 Spatms https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Congo_Square_(New_Orleans).jpg https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0 United States